Websnare Blog

Upgrading your computer’s RAM will lead to faster load times for programs, files and also websites. As software requires a progressively greater amount of processing power every year, the demands on your computer are constantly creeping higher. Thankfully RAM is relatively inexpensive compared to other computer upgrades, and in many cases easy to install yourself. A RAM upgrade will also make webpages load faster; regardless of how fast your internet speed is, your computer can only render pages up to the limit of its processing power. For a small investment, upgrading your computer’s RAM can add years of life, and better functionality, to your trusty computer.

One of the best things you can use a tool like Google Analytics for is tracking user flow or the path that users take from one page to the next before arriving at their final destination. Examining a user flow can show the most common paths that users are taking to get to the information for which they are looking. If you notice a pattern of users going to a page that is buried deep in the navigation, the page could be important or popular enough to warrant being moved higher up in the navigation scheme. Analyzing your website’s user flow could reveal behaviors amongst your users that you were not aware of and will allow you to make content tweaks that will direct them to the information they need more quickly.

The eye has a natural tendency to scan in the direction of reading. This has led classic design to favor a layout where elements are arranged in the same direction as reading a paragraph. For English speakers (and several world language groups, of course), headlines and copy would begin in the upper left-hand corner of the webpage. Similarly, the company’s logo and brand elements would appear in the upper left-hand corner of the website framing the content below. A user’s eye will move in a Z pattern following a left-to-right and top-to-bottom path along the page. An effective web layout will exploit this tendency and place the most important headlines and copy in the upper left-hand corner. Images supporting the copy can be placed in the upper right-hand and lower left-hand corners to fill out the page (remember not to use too much copy). Even though this technique was developed for print layouts, it is still a useful way to design website layouts as well as reading itself still follows the same principles.

Some design philosophy posits that the design of something should go almost unnoticed because it functions so well that everything else besides the intended function is transparent and unobtrusive. This method of design which focuses on user experience over all else can take many forms: not everything needs to adhere to the ultra-minimal modern aesthetic, but if it can be used easily by the target audience, or even better yet a wide portion of the population, then it is a successful design. Adding more aesthetic elements can become superfluous is they do not fulfill any functional roles. Each addition to a page’s layout adds an element that will demand some attention - adding too many elements can distract from important calls-to-action and navigational items. In short, a website should strive to be aesthetically pleasing, but functionality should rule the day in most design decisions.

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