Websnare Blog

 Problem 1: What's it gonna cost?

Many times, quotes can be underestimated. Every project is different. Designers must take various factors into account when gathering client requirements.

Solution 1: Agree to a budget beforehand.

We can tell you if a budget is reasonable for what you're trying to accomplish. If it's tight, we can help you prioritize features, and make sure the critical ones are done first before the budget is exhausted.

Problem 2: Requirements are not specific.

You need to be extremely specific and detailed about what the finished site needs to look like, and how it needs to operate. The overall cost of the project can change alot based on seemingly minor requirements. You get through part of the project, and realize the requirements overlooked some critical feature you really need, or didn't specify clearly enough. Now all work comes to a halt as the developer needs to renegotiate the contract. The client is unhappy because they're paying more, and the project is late. 

Problem 3: Requirements prevent changing to a more suitable solution.

We get part way through building a site, and realize that if we had chosen a different approach or platform, the end result would work much better for the client. But we're far enough down the path of the current development to back up, and our original approach does fulfill the requirement. We're unhappy delivering a site that could be better, and our customers end up with a clunkier, less than optimal site—but it's easier than going back and renegotiating with the client.

Solution for Problem 2 & 3: Scrap the requirements.

Requirements can almost always generate resentment, and they're also largely unnecessary for small web projects. It is important to have a clear agreement and what is being delivered. Unfortunately, there are a ton of variables, and many of them are not discovered until the project is well underway. Doing the groundwork to identify all the possible pitfalls of a project is probably about half the actual work of a project—and in most cases, that's far more of an investment than the client wants to make without an actual result. Designers almost always put far more into the discovery than planned.

Instead of having hard requirements, we help our customers identify goals and rank them by priority. We start with a previously-finished configuration, and use the budget to modify that configuration towards the goals.

So you probably know what Google indexing is if you read my last blog.  Google crawls your site and adds pages to its index. All results are pulled from the desktop-specific index. Now is the time to get a responsive design, because Google’s primary search index will soon be mobile. If your site isn’t friendly to a mobile audience, you shouldn’t expect it to rank well for certain keywords. When the bot finds that your site is hostile to mobile users or loads very slowly, you’re definitely going to lose rank.  

Want to see how your sites “look” to the Googlebot that uses a mobile user agent? Go to the Google Search Console (formerly Google Webmasters) and click on the “crawl” option on the left-hand sidebar. In the menu that appears, click on “Fetch as Google.  The screen that appears gives you the opportunity to crawl your site as the Googlebot and see what it sees. To see it as a Googlebot using a mobile user agent, you’ll need to select “mobile smartphone” from the drop-down menu next to the “Fetch” button. Click the “Fetch and Render” button and the tool will show you exactly what the crawler sees as it touches your website. That will give you a good idea about how mobile-friendly your site is.

The bottom line- Your prime directive needs to start with optimizing your site for a mobile audience for a better reach. Websnare can quickly build your responsive design!

Responsive design makes a site render well across multiple devices. You MUST have this technology to keep up with your competitors. Most consumers browse their mobile devices these days, and you will lose alot of business if you cannot keep up. Not everyone is doing it right. As the use of responsive design has grown, so have the mistakes in implementing it. 

1. Failure to Analyze Shopper Behavior

This is critical input to the design, as it reveals the most frequently used mobile devices, the most frequently performed operations on a mobile device, conversion rate from mobile devices, and other issues raised by shoppers using the mobile devices. These factors are important to ensure the mobile experience meets the needs of shoppers.

2. Starting with the Desktop Version

Most retailers start designing their sites for the desktop version first, even though it is easier to start with a smaller mobile screen and then scale upwards for a desktop. Moreover, most retailers do not realize the technical challenges of scaling a site down to support smartphones.

By focusing first on smaller screens, the emphasis is on designing a better experience for mobile users — making it easier to design for both channels: desktop and mobile.

3. Lack of Testing

Responsive sites are often released with minimal or no testing. At a minimum, test the main user flows on the site for the primary browsers and operating systems and also for the top mobile device and browser combinations. And this needs to be done for any changes made on the site. With easy-to-use automated testing tools available, testing can be done in a few hours.

4. Call-to-action Buttons Too Small for Mobile Screens

In an attempt to fit everything on a small smartphone screen, ecommerce merchants often make the call-to-action buttons too small. If users have to zoom in to click a button or end up clicking the wrong buttons because the size is too small, they could get frustrated and leave the site.

5. Slow-loading Mobile Pages

Mobile users want to be quick! It’s important to keep the page size as small as possible so that it will load quickly. Review all the content — images, buttons, text — before including on a page. Google has reportedly started including page speed for ranking websites in the search results, so that makes it even more important to have a lighter site.

6. Less Content for Mobile Users

Ecommerce sites often hide content for mobile users to make the page size smaller. In many cases, however, the page size is not smaller. Content is simply hidden when the page is shown to the end user. Other sites are able to properly generate the page dynamically to reduce the size, which does improve the download speed for a mobile users.

7. Supporting Only One Image Resolution

A well-designed responsive site will change the resolution of images based on a user’s device. But many sites, still, fail to do this. Large images result in slower load times for mobile devices.

8. Emails Are Not Responsive

As a result, mobile users struggle to review their order details or navigate through the list of recommended products in an email before finding the products that were actually purchased.

Emails are a key customer touch point. They need to be part of the responsive design and testing process. Keep the emails light, with only the most relevant information.

 

More and more users do business on their mobile phones these days. The true purpose of responsive web design is to make websites easily navigable across devices. If you take advantage of responsive web design, your business can have a new set of customers. You can gear business towards those people who aren’t always near a computer. Using web design effectively allows you to capitalize on the technology of the time to gain all the customers you can. There is a significant difference between the display size of PCs and that of mobile phones and tablets. Therefore, ensuring that all the information that users expect to access up-front should be adjusted on the top section of the website. Without prioritizing the content, responsive web design may rather yield reverse effect – discourage users to search for information though their mobile devices.