Websnare Blog
websnare

websnare

Customers carry their phones with them. At ALL times. Have you looked around lately? Everyone is buried in their data. You probably didn't notice since you are, as well! If you own a business, you should seriously consider building an app. 

 

Customers want to find what they need in a location nearby

Many websites offer location-based services that let you enter your zip code to find results, but smartphones eliminate the need for customers to manually enter any information and instead provide the instant gratification of finding what they’re looking for based on their location.

 

Notifications in real time

Push notifications have made it easier for any business to get in touch with their customers by sending critical information or marketing offers directly to the user. Emails are easily ignored and sent to spam. If a user downloads your app, then you’re in a good position to engage with that customer.  They are more likely to tap on an app if they see a notification count next to it.

 

Personalization is easier

Once authenticated, a user wont have to log in again. On a website, you can only keep the user online for a limited amount of time either because of online legal regulations or because a user will clear their cache, making you lose the connection with that customer. On mobile this is not an issue. You can show personalized deals and recommendations. You can take them straight to your homepage or to any other page that you think will convert to a sale. You can show previous activity on the app or suggest something new. There are no limits to how well you can personalize a user’s in-app experience. Mobile apps can be very powerful tools based on the data points they’ve collected in the past. Don’t miss out – personalization is key on mobile!

 

Convenience

People find themselves in offline mode all the time. When your app is loaded on the customer’s phone you’re not so reliant on network or Wi-Fi connectivity which allows you to continue engaging with your users. 

Larry Harte

Aug 15,2016
Larry Harte graduated from Vanderbilt University and has worked in a variety of entrepreneurial adventures, government roles, and non-profit boards.  With a passion for helping businesses grow and delivering exceptional customer service, his focus recently has been on creating strategic business connections - focusing on managing, connecting and expanding businesses.
 

Career highlights include selling his first company in 2000, enjoying 10 years on the Glendale City Planning Commission, 8 years as mayor in the City of Glendale, 8 years as the CEO of the Glendale Chamber of Commerce, and serving on boards of the Denver/Boulder BBB, Livewell Colorado, the Tour de Cure, the YMCA, among others.

His interests include family, architecture, history, music, health, soccer and riding his bike in the mountains. 

John Hammen

Jun 20,2016

John has an MSEE and 15+ years experience as an IT and web developer, specializing in Java and JavaScript technologies. During this time he has brought modern technology to literally dozens of clients from small startups to large corporate and governmental organizations. His current technology interests include the new batch of advanced JavaScript frameworks as well as all kinds of mobile development. He has had a lot of fun at Websnare leveraging the latest mobile web hybrid technologies (e.g. jQuery Mobile, Cordova/Phonegap) to build truly responsive mobile applications. When not coding John moonlights as recording engineer and soundman for a variety of local Denver bands.

Mark Pippins

Jun 20,2016

Mark Pippins has two decades of software development experience in high-performance environments, having worked on high-frequency trading systems, clinical trial analysis systems and mission critical subsystems in complex software topologies. He has an agnostic attitude toward technology, seeing each business problem as unique and worthy of being solved with the most appropriate tool set. Originally a Delphi developer in the investment banking sector, he moved to Java in 2000, initially focusing on rich client applications and ultimately expanding to applications based on web frameworks. Rather than focusing exclusively on technology, Mark often wears the analyst's hat, focusing on business processes and user expectations first and then delivering solutions that streamline tasks and operations in an intuitive way. Away from the computer, Mark can often be found chasing the sun on a recumbent bike, deep in the mud on a mountain bike or listening to music. "All styles all the time" being the preferred genre.